[Translated Story Series 1.2] “Le Vigneron dans sa vigne”

Hi! This is the second in a series of translations from Jules Renard’s Le Vigneron dans sa vigne. The first segment can be found here, and the original French text here. The Vintner in His Vineyard Mores of the Philippes II I paid them a visit for the new year. I had left a bushy country, … More [Translated Story Series 1.2] “Le Vigneron dans sa vigne”

Why I’m Translating a Jules Renard Book and Posting It on my Blog

It’s quite simple, really. Le Vigneron dans sa vigne does not appear to have been translated into English previously, it’s in the public domain, and when I found I had easy access to the French version online, it seemed like it would be fun to have a crack at it. So it wasn’t really a well thought-out decision. … More Why I’m Translating a Jules Renard Book and Posting It on my Blog

[Translated Story Series 1.1] Jules Renard’s “Le Vigneron dans sa vigne”

Jules Renard, a French author who lived from 1864-1910, is probably best-known in the English-speaking world for Poil de carotte (Carrot Top), an episodic work about a boy’s difficult childhood that has been translated into English, and his eminently quotable journal. However, Renard wrote several other books that have never been translated into English or are not … More [Translated Story Series 1.1] Jules Renard’s “Le Vigneron dans sa vigne”

What Does Kakutani’s Hitler-Trump Buzz Say About Book Reviews in General?

So. There’s already been quite a to-do surrounding Michiko Kakutani’s so-called thinly-veiled attack on Trump in her recent New York Times review of historian Volker Ullrich’s Hitler: Ascent, 1889-1939.  While her review definitely gives a nod to the significance of Ullrich’s work and delves quite thoroughly into parts of it, her examination of the book comes … More What Does Kakutani’s Hitler-Trump Buzz Say About Book Reviews in General?

Nabokov’s Exploding Book: The Criminal Romp “Despair”

I tend to have problems with Nabokov books. I mean the actual, physical books. Years ago, I bought a copy of Bend Sinister and never got a chance to read the damned thing because this particular edition was bound by a barely flexible plastic cover. When I tried to open the novel more than 90°, the … More Nabokov’s Exploding Book: The Criminal Romp “Despair”

“The Bridesmaid” On-page and On-Screen: Rendell Begets Chabrol in a Filthy Basement

Today, I’d like to talk to you about The Bridesmaid. No, not Bridesmaids. Not Revenge of the Bridesmaids. La demoiselle d’honneur. Of course, I’m referring to two versions of a story here: The original suspense novel in English by British author Ruth Rendell and its 2004 film adaptation by French New Wave director Claude Chabrol. For a certain period, Chabrol’s … More “The Bridesmaid” On-page and On-Screen: Rendell Begets Chabrol in a Filthy Basement

Patricia Highsmith’s Novels: The Best, the Worst and the Weirdly Intriguing

Patricia Highsmith is a literary wildcard. Her work may be considered amateurish by book snobs whose primary concern is high art, and too fully-formed for genre fans whose primary concern is entertainment. But I’ve gotten the impression that neither of these phenomena is the norm. Rather, it seems like readers generally love her for having … More Patricia Highsmith’s Novels: The Best, the Worst and the Weirdly Intriguing

Inio Asano’s Tokyo On-screen: E-reading “Solanin” and “What a Wonderful World!”

I discovered manga author Inio Asano years ago through one of the inter-language accidents of fate I love: I picked up Volume One of What a Wonderful World! in a used bookstore, translated from Japanese into French, in an edition that I can today not even find on Amazon.fr. At the time, I didn’t know anything about … More Inio Asano’s Tokyo On-screen: E-reading “Solanin” and “What a Wonderful World!”

A Fairy Tale Day with “Her Father’s Daughter” by Marie Sizun

Writing a novel is easy. That’s not my opinion. In fact, it goes against my own now-educated opinion, but it’s the impression you might come away with after reading Her Father’s Daughter by Marie Sizun. To be precise, I’m talking about the translation of Sizun’s novel by Adriana Hunter (who I’ve figured to the best of my … More A Fairy Tale Day with “Her Father’s Daughter” by Marie Sizun

New Huge Paul Auster Novel Coming in 4 3 2 1…

Whatever your opinion of Paul Auster, he’s an interesting guy. His translations, his autobiographical writings (like the endearingly funny Hand to Mouth: A Chronicle of Early Failure) and his novels (including The New York Trilogy, a surrealistic take on noir thrillers) all offer different pieces of what may not even be a single puzzle. While I … More New Huge Paul Auster Novel Coming in 4 3 2 1…